THE TOP MENTAL HEALTH CHALLENGES FACING STUDENTS

Here is a really good article that addresses the 5 top mental health challenges facing students today.  According to this article, they are:  depression, anxiety, suicide, eating disorder, and addiction.  These are certainly important issues that young adults face once they are on their own, and the best thing about this article is the list of resources for each one of these issues.

If you have a young person going away to college, please read this article and make this information available to them.


 

THE TOP MENTAL HEALTH CHALLENGES FACING STUDENTS

This guide helps to identify the signs and symptoms of common mental health issues for college students and where and when to seek help. Left untreated, these issues can become debilitating for students, so whether you feel you are experiencing these issues or find yourself concerned for a friend or peer, it is important to take action now.

Research conducted by the National Alliance on Mental Illness on mental health on college campuses shows that:

  • One in four students have a diagnosable illness
  • 40% do not seek help
  • 80% feel overwhelmed by their responsibilities
  • 50% have been so anxious they struggled in school

While there are certainly growing concerns over other mental health issues affecting college students today, this article covers the prevalent issues of depression, anxiety, suicide, eating disorders and addiction. Our guide is not a substitute for treatment, but it will help you find resources that lead to a happier and healthier college career.

Please note that in any situation, it may be difficult for you to approach a friend regarding these illnesses. People do not like to be told when they are sick, what they are feeling or what to do. When it comes to several of these conditions, it is important that you, as a friend, are aware of what’s happening, but know that the decision to get professional help is ultimately your friend’s choice. You should be supportive and patient, but adding too much pressure to a friend with any of these diseases could make it worse.

If you find that you’ve developed one of these mental health ailments, try to remember that your friends are looking out for your best interests. They want you to be well, and they are not attacking you. Talking about your problems with someone close to you may seem like a daunting task, but try to let them help you until you are ready to seek the professional help you need to get better.

Depression

Depression among college students wears many faces, and, in a survey conducted by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, 36.4% of college students reported they experienced some level of depression in 2013. Depression is the number one reason students drop out of school, and is a gateway issue that, if left untreated, could lead to other symptoms or suicide. Depression is a common but serious illness that leaves you feeling despondent and helpless, completely detached from the world. It interferes with your life, making it difficult to work, study, sleep and eat.

Depressive illnesses are disorders of the brain and are likely caused by a combination of genetics, biological, psychological and environmental factors. According to the American Psychological Association, there has been a significant increase in the number of students seeking help for serious mental health problems at campus counseling centers since the mid-1990s, with depression at the forefront of the concerns.

SYMPTOMS

Symptoms for depression differ from person to person. It is caused by a chemical imbalance in our brains, so the way one displays depressive signs is not, necessarily, the way symptoms emerge in others. There will be similarities, but how each person reacts and behaves is determined by how they handle change, where they are in their lives and their proclivity to becoming depressed. Symptoms of depression may include, but are not limited to:

  • Feelings of sadness or unhappiness
  • Change in appetite or weight
  • Slowed thinking or speech
  • Loss of interest in activities or social gatherings
  • Fatigue, loss in energy, sleeplessness
  • Feelings of guilt or anger over past failures
  • Trouble concentrating, indecisiveness
  • Anger or frustration for no distinct reason
  • Thoughts of dying, death and suicide

We all face some of these issues from time to time, but that does not automatically mean you or your friends are depressed. However, if you begin to experience these symptoms with some regularity, or several symptoms consecutively, you may want to consult your school’s mental health center…(read the entire article here)

 

 

This entry was posted in Blog posts, Mental Health Articles, Mental Health Issues and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.